Solo work

Made, Fusion Theatre Fest (June 2019)
Made, Fusion Theatre Fest (June 2019)

Made was a comic exploration of vulnerability, beauty, and identity formation. It examined the gap between self-image and the way we are perceived - between creator and spectator. And, put simply, it asked the question: are cosmetics for you, or for me?

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In the first part of the performance, I faced the back of the stage and applied my makeup, all the while using a handheld mirror to connect with individual audience members, rather than looking at myself. What followed was a hot mess, but when I turned to face the audience, I felt like I knew them each of them already. Set against a soundtrack of Ariana Grande and Lana del Ray, this piece was about identity formation, and the way we show ourselves to others.

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I wanted to reflect the sense that the studio, like a pre-loved home, had had many lives already. In bringing my own objects into the space, I superimposed my image of home onto its existing architectural features, which have had other uses in the past. Belonging(s) was an incessant cycle of making, unmaking and moving, which grew steadily more chaotic.

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Made, Fusion Theatre Fest (June 2019)
Made, Fusion Theatre Fest (June 2019)

Made was a comic exploration of vulnerability, beauty, and identity formation. It examined the gap between self-image and the way we are perceived - between creator and spectator. And, put simply, it asked the question: are cosmetics for you, or for me?

press to zoom
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Collaborations

Flâneuses of Soho, Site Specific (March 2019)

Flâneuses of Soho, Site Specific (March 2019)

Flâneuses of Soho was a promenade live art piece, in which groups of spectators were led through the streets of Soho. Inspired by the concept of the flâneuse, the female inflection of flâneur, the nineteenth century wandering (male) figure, we set about to defy historical and cultural restrictions on women's freedom of movement.

In embodying the flâneuse, we moved slowly, ghost-like, through the streets of Soho, drawing attention to ourselves, and to the hidden economy of women that dominates Soho. Spectators were guided by our responses to the site in touch, gesture and words. We annotated the area, writing our reflections on stickers which began to converse with each other as our routes overlapped, turning certain landmarks into anarchic shrines to women's presence in Soho.

How To Make Me Happy (Hatch It Theatre), Brighton and Camde

How To Make Me Happy (Hatch It Theatre), Brighton and Camde

How To Make Me Happy explored happiness and co-dependence. It was a participatory show, which featured characters who were "stuck" - rendered immobile in an undefined "void" - until the input of audience members gradually freed them. The play was largely structured around games with the audience, and by the end, everyone was on their feet, and there was no longer a divide between stage and auditorium. At the heart of the show was a message about empathy: self-reliance can only get us so far.

Whalebone (Hatch It Theatre), Edinburgh Fringe and Pleasance Islington (2017)

Whalebone (Hatch It Theatre), Edinburgh Fringe and Pleasance Islington (2017)

Whalebone used puppetry, clowning and physical theatre to tell the story of a woman who, when faced with the absurd pressures that society places on the female form, decides not to have a body at all.

Loosely based on Nabokov's unfinished novel, 'The Original of Laura', Whalebone was an irreverent yet touching show, which involved puppeteered underwear, a talking vagina, and a woman who turns into a jellyfish.

In The Pink (Hatch It Theatre), The Courtyard, Hoxton (2016)

In The Pink (Hatch It Theatre), The Courtyard, Hoxton (2016)

In The Pink was a semi-verbatim piece featuring five 90-year-old women who live in a retirement home. Despite using the words of 90-year-olds, we deliberately cast young actors, with the idea being to offer a glimpse of the women in their prime.

With much of the script appropriated from old women, In The Pink sought to undermine negative stereotypes about ageing. Ranging in theme from love, sex and wartime memories, to dementia and bodily malfunction, the play reached across generational divides, and offered an insight into the lives of a section of society that is often overlooked.

Hatch It Theatre

Hatch It was a theatre company dedicated to making shows that were formally experimental and socially conscious. 

Praise for How To Make Me Happy:

"It is simply a beautifully crafted platform for the audience and performer to really talk, and maybe even find some happiness together." (*****The Spy in the Stalls)

Praise for Whalebone:

"Dynamic, affecting physical theatre" (****The Stage, Highlights of the Fringe 2017)

"It's rare to see a show deal with such an important issue in a manner so delightfully playful" (*****Three Weeks)

"Every time I think about Whalebone, it gets better" (*****The Panoptic)

Praise for In The Pink:

"A highly entertaining piece that is, above all, a work of love." (A Younger Theatre)